Golden Boy, realistic golden retriever pattern

I proudly present to you the first realistic dog pattern in a new series of dogs, Golden Boy the golden retriever, and he could as well be a blond labrador!

realistic dog amigurumi

‘A new series?’ you ask. Yes, for a long time I’ve been getting requests to design realistic dog patterns for all sorts of breeds. Because I prefer making wildlife patterns, I hadn’t responded to those requests. But something changed my mind. I noticed that many crafters have turned my wolf pattern Woolfie into a dog, which made me realise how enthusiastic people are about making dogs, and especially their own dog. So I decided to do a series of realistic dog patterns. My ultimate favourite dog is the border collie, but I also love blond golden retrievers with their sad puppy dog eyes and black noses. I decided to start with a single-coloured dog to completely focus on dog shapes, and when I’m more familiar with that, I can do dogs with their individual breed’s colouring, like the border collie and the beagle. And after coloured dogs, or in between, I can focus on the challenge of dogs with special kinds of fur, like poodles and bearded collies. It sure offers many exciting variations!

I never expected I would love designing a realistic crochet dog so much, but believe me, it’s fabulous when you ‘catch’ a breed’s true character in its facial features, and when I had my first prototype face done it really made me smile. The sad puppy dog eyes I love so much are truly there. Now every time I see Golden Boy looking at me with his sweet eyes I want to give him a little cuddle, he’s so adorable. Breeding and selection eventually created that expression that humans love so much, and I’m very excited that it is so easy to capture in crochet.

Because golden retrievers and labradors often are guide companions, I decided to give Golden Boy a colourful harness. Guide dog or just a pet, the harness makes him look extra cute! Below the pictures you can find all the info you need and links to buy this amigurumi dog pattern.

Info about & links to buy the pattern

The pattern for Golden Boy is easy; you can surely finish a dog in a day. It’s also a very suitable pattern for those of you who have just started crocheting amigurumi, because there are no colour changes and only basic stitches are used. The things that look more complicated are explained in detail, with images to guide you.

This dog is made with Istex Lett Lopi, a 100% wool with a lot of fuzziness. He’s 5.1 inch /13 cm sitting. The pattern contains a clear and colour-coded description of how to crochet and assemble the doll, with instruction images next to the text and example pictures at the bottom to help you get everything right. In the pattern you can also find out what materials you need, the yarn colour numbers — in short, everything you need to know to make your own dog. All the additional information you need to know about this pattern you can find in the shop listings. You can buy this pattern in my shop at Ravelry, Etsy or order it here.

And heads up! This pattern has a one dollar release discount till Tuesday, the 11th of Februari!

Balthazar, realistic crochet cat pattern

This must be the most mischievous-looking amigurumi cat you’ve ever come across! I proudly present to you my playful and realistic crochet cat pattern.

Realistic crochet cat

Whilst writing this blogpost, Balthazar is standing opposite me on my desk looking like he’s up to no good. I have no idea how I do it, give an animal an attitude like that. It seems like it just happens, or perhaps I unconsciously prefer the version that has that slightly imperfect feature and I decide that will be the final version. Anyway, this new and realistic crochet cat looks like an adolescent cat that is fun to play with.

And that was my goal to begin with. Cats are the most cuddly, soft and lovely pets one can wish for, but they also are the most silly housemates you can get. So I had to get that characteristic in both the face and the posture. When I started working on the head, I realised cats have a distinctive-looking snout, a small nose, an almost laughing mouth and that lovely chin I always loved to touch when we still had a cat. I had to figure out a way to create a little chin (without it being a sewn-on piece), which you can easily outline with a sewn-on mouth. At some point I got an idea that was both a super-easy thing to crochet and that worked perfectly.When you make this cat, you’ll find out the simple trick I used.

When I started working on a cat pattern, I wasn’t sure yet what type of cat I should make, so I tried out several different versions. It was a lot of fun, but it also created a dilemma: which one will I finish? And should I make separate patterns for each kind or add these to one pattern? For now, I decided to just publish one pattern, of the tabby cat. But I probably will make an add-on pattern later for different kinds of cats.

When I designed this pattern, I wanted a cat that could both sit down with a relaxed grin, but also would be a playful doll for children. So it had to be flexible, and that is why I chose loose hind legs, to make the cat just a bit more playful than a seamless cat would be. I had so much fun doing this photoshoot, at some point I started the ‘playful’ pictures, and they turned out so lively, I was delighted with the result.  Just take a look at this! Below these pictures you can find all the info you need about the pattern.

Info about & links to buy the pattern

This crochet tabby cat is not very difficult to make, except for the colouring of the head, which takes a lot of attention. For some rounds you change colour stitch after stitch, and one unspotted mistake ‘messes the whole thing up’. I added extra pictures for these complicated rounds, and it is just matter of recounting each round you’ve finished to be sure you’ve done it right. The rest of the pattern should be easy to do; attaching of the front paws needs some extra attention but I added extra images there, too.

This cat is made with Istex Lett Lopi, a 100% wool with a lot of fuzziness. He’s 5.1 inch /13 cm sitting. The pattern contains a clear and colour-coded description of how to crochet and assemble the doll, with instruction images next to the text and example pictures at the bottom to help you get everything right. In the pattern you can also find what materials you need, the yarn colour numbers — in short, everything you need to know to make your own realistic crochet cat. All the additional information you need to know about this pattern you can find in the shop listings. You can buy this pattern in my shop at Ravelry, Etsy or order it here.

And heads up! This pattern has a one dollar release discount till Thursday, the 11th of December!

Flunsie, relaxed and realistic crochet badger pattern

My experimental holiday project has turned into this utterly cute crochet badger! I proudly present to you this exciting new pattern for Flunsie, the realistic relaxing badger.

realsitic crochet badger

You’re right to think this took me a long time, because it really did! It started out as a summer project, to try out new techniques with a different yarn. It seemed like a fun idea to make myself a badger in this (un)charming pose that I often see when I watch videos of badgers taken with wildlife cameras. When they come out of their set at night, they’ll often sit in front of it for a while scratching and washing, and I just love that silly look. It seemed like the perfect pose to try out a new technique: short rows to make the head and body as one piece. But there was one thing I overlooked in my enthusiasm: my favourite animal has a striped head, and short rows combined with stripes aren’t the easiest combination when trying this for the first time. It was a disaster, and I gave up. It was only when I started working again that I grabbed my courage and decided to give it one more go. If it would work, how awesome would that be?! It had to become a pattern, too, not just a doll for me.

I decided to use my beloved Lopi yarn instead of the DK yarn I tried during my vacation, to have something familiar to work with. I also had the notes I had made, so I didn’t have to start from scratch. My idea was to go slow, one row at the time, because eventually the colours should line up. That approach worked well because I wasn’t feeling any pressure. I could undo rows as often as needed, and after many attempts, I finally had a head with a neck in the shape I desired and with perfect black and white badger stripes. I was so delighted!

Designing the body was easier because no short rows were needed there. I also made a drawing to scale, so I could lay the badger on top of it to check if the size and shape were good. Designing the paws was manageable, because I could use paws from other creatures have I designed and I only needed to adjust them. I also had the idea to make the feet extra special by adding ‘animal’ prints to them, and when I tried it out it looked amazing, very suitable it for this amigurumi badger.

When I was working on the pattern, I got a funny image in my mind of a knitting badger. I remembered this tiny knitted hat I have, added some toothpicks as knitting needles, took a picture, and posted it on Instagram. Every time I look at it I smile, and everyone totally loved it. So if you feel like it, you could make a knitting badger yourself! Here are some more pictures of Flunsie, and below them you can find more info about the pattern and links to buy it, so read on!

Info about & links to buy the pattern

I’m rating this crochet badger pattern as ‘advanced’ in my shops, but hope I made it so easy to work with that less experienced crocheters can make it, too. The short rows may sound difficult, but you just go back and forth sometimes instead of working into a continuous spiral. I added lots of instruction photos so you can see how to do the short rows.

This badger is made with Istex Lett Lopi, a 100% wool with a lot of fuzziness. He’s 5.1 inch /13 cm high. The pattern contains a clear and colour-coded description of how to crochet and assemble the doll, with instruction images next to the text and example pictures at the bottom to help you get everything right. In the pattern you can also find what materials you need, the yarn colour numbers — in short, everything you need to know to make your own badger amigurumi. All the additional information you need to know about this pattern you can find in the shop listings. You can buy this pattern in my shop at Ravelry, Etsy or order it here.

And heads up! This pattern has a one dollar release discount till Thursday, the 8th of October!

Flamsie & cubs, two realistic crochet fox patterns!

I am so happy I can finally show you my finished crochet foxes. Meet Flamsie and the little ones!

amigurumi fox

This adventure started with the idea of making a fox with cubs. I’m monitoring wildlife as a volunteer, and this time of the year we see a lot of young foxes on our camera traps. I really love seeing them and was lucky enough to spot one when we were checking a heather field for badger activity. Suddenly a cute fox cub was looking straight at us!

I started this project with the cubs. Shaping something much smaller is a whole new thing for me, and I really had to get used to it. Also, getting the light-coloured chin and chest symmetrical turned out to be quite a challenge. It took me a long time to create a cub that I adored, and I soon realised that this little fox was way too special to just add to the fox pattern. This had to be a separate pattern so everyone could make it.

After the little ones were finished I started working on the adult. And you know what was ever so silly? Each head I made I found huge! Now I had to re-adjust to my normal size. I ignored my feelings of finding everything enormous and patiently designed the right shapes and colouring for the adult fox amigurumi. I stumbled upon the same colouring difficulties as for the cub, but I stubbornly kept trying until I got it right. There was no way I was going to make this crochet fox with a sewn-on muzzle, the head had to be made in one piece, just like the wolf.

Making the fox’s body was much easier because I got familiar with this way of working when I made the wolf. The fox had to be smaller and more slender with a bigger tail. When the fox was finished, I placed the wolf and fox next to each other and I was satisfied. They are both such lovely doll versions of the real animals, the slender fox and the sturdy wolf.

When I was working on the cubs and realised how much extra work it was going to be, I decided I wasn’t going to do something like this again. Nevertheless cats and kittens are popping into my mind already, because the end result is so delightful. Every time I pass my adorable fox family I get a smile on my face, they are so cute together! The adult fox is a playful doll which you can place in different poses, and the cubs are even easier to play with.

For those of you who look forward to making a family, the fox and cubs are ‘a pack’ until one week after the pattern release. After that they will be separate patterns. So I get them soon if you want them all!

Here are some more pictures of these totally cute crochet foxes, and below them you can find all the info you need to know about how to get the patterns.

Info about & links to buy the pattern

These realistic foxes are made with Istex Lett Lopi, a 100% wool with a lot of fuzziness. Flamsie is 5.5 inch / 14 cm sitting, the cubs are 6 inch / 15 cm long when made with this yarn. They aren’t very difficult to crochet, even the seamless bits are quite easy to attach if you follow the instructions.

The patterns contain a clear and colour-coded description of how to crochet and assemble the animals, with extra illustrations and example pictures at the bottom to help you get everything right. In the patterns you can also find what materials you need, the yarn colour numbers, in short, everything you need to know to make your own fox  amigurumis. All the additional information you need to know about this pattern you can find in the shop listings.

You can buy the pattern for Flamsie by clicking this Ravelry or Etsy link. And the pattern for the cubs by clicking this Ravelry or Etsy link. You can also buy both patterns directly from me here.

And heads up! For one week from now Flamsie’s pattern includes the pattern for the cubs. So if you want both, get it before the 22nd of Juli.

Flisby, crochet kingfisher pattern

This must be the most challenging pattern I’ve ever designed. I proudly present to you Flisby, the amigurumi kingfisher!

amigurumi kingfisher

Birds are slowly becoming part of the collection of crochet animal patterns I’ve designed. Because birds aren’t fluffy and cuddly, they somehow often miss my attention. Only the ones that are very dear to me make it into a crochet pattern. The kingfisher is an example of that. For the last few years I’ve been doing volunteer work as a fieldworker, basically I’m tracking animals so that the local wildlife organisations can map what lives where, to protect the animals and, for example, to create save passageways underneath roads, etc. I started in a badger team, but this year I expanded my work by collecting otter spraints (scat) for DNA analyses. That’s when I stumbled upon beaver tracks in an area they had not been seen before (it was fabulous, imagine how excited I was!). That of course led to a search for the beaver’s home, and that brings me back to the kingfisher. Practically every time I was following the beaver’s trail, which was an amazing adventure, I heard or saw a gorgeous kingfisher. They are birds of an exceptional beauty, and you always hear their cheerful shrieks before you see them flash by. I’ve been fortunate to see one sitting down a few times, and I was surprised by how small they actually are. Somehow I made them bigger in my mind because they are so beautiful.

So then came the challenge to create a crochet version. How was I going to mix realism and my doll-ish style in a little crochet bird? I started with designing the bill, which had to be as small and pointed as possible. If I got the bill right, I basically knew the size for the rest of the bird. I had in mind to make the kingfisher in one piece, so a seamless bill, head and body. But when I made the bill seamless, the shape was all wrong, way too flat. And when I finished the head with all the colour changes in the right place, I crocheted ahead to make the body, but I couldn’t get the shape right. So I started a new body, from the bottom up. When all the pieces where finished, I decided to keep it like this. I liked the seam between the head and body, the versions I had that were made in one piece looked stiff. My crochet animals must look playful, and for a bird that’s more difficult than a mammal. I think I managed to add a bit of doll-style in how I designed the feet and wings. Of course real birds have tiny feet, so I could have used a different material to create realistic feet, but I love the features of crochet, so I made the smallest possible, cute little bobble stitch feet. It gives Flisby the right personality, it makes him a Popke!

I could write so much more about this process, about how difficult it was to choose the right colours and the effort to create the perfect colour changes. All I’ll say is, I really love my little kingfisher. I love how the embroidered spots create that glowing shine of feathers, and I also love how this crochet kingfisher is about life-size when he’s made with the yarn I used, how about that! Here are some more pictures of Flisby, and below them you can find all the info you need about this pattern.

Info about & links to buy the pattern

This realistic crochet kingfisher is made with Istex Lett Lopi, a 100% wool with a lot of fuzziness. He is 4.3 inch / 11 cm tall when made with this yarn. Despite the many colour changes for the head, this isn’t a very difficult pattern to crochet, as long as you follow the instructions to the letter and untangle your skeins after every round. The spots on the head and wings are easy enough to embroider because of the way they are placed. Assembling the animal and getting all the pieces in the right place will require some skill, but I guide you with the text and images in the pattern. As long as you take your time, you can make yourself a gorgeous little bird, I’m sure!

The pattern contains a clear and colour-coded description of how to crochet and assemble this animal, with extra illustrations and example pictures at the bottom. In the pattern you can also find what materials you need, the yarn colour numbers, in short, everything you need to know to make your own kingfisher amigurumi. All the additional information you need to know about this pattern you can find in the shop listings. You can buy this pattern in my shop at Ravelry, Etsy or order it here.

This pattern has a one dollar release discount till Thursday the 21st of May!

Woolfie, realistic crochet wolf pattern

Never have I worked on a pattern for so long, and now I can finally show you Woolfie, my refreshing new crochet wolf pattern!

Realistic crochet wolf

Refreshing? Well, yes, I learned a few new techniques to make this wolf amigurumi. More about that later.

For quite a while I have wanted to make a fox that can sit but that has flexible limbs. Somehow it didn’t work out no matter what I tried, so at some point I gave up. But then came the news that a wolf had been seen in my country, and then another one and even more. Wolves have been extinct for a long time in my country, but these sightings meant that wolves were interested in living here. And then a female wolf settled in a rural part of the Netherlands and successfully raised three pups. Wolves have now officially returned! I think this is fabulous, and I hope it will work out. Of course I had to make a new wolf pattern now. I stepped back into the ‘drawing room’ and took another look at my fox sketches. It became clear that if I wanted to make a fabulous wolf, I would need to improve the technique I had tried to use for that fox. So I practised, making many sketches to visualise how everything should look. And then I started crocheting.

First I made the head. I figured that if I made a cute face, it would be difficult to quit and I would have to finish the rest. And it worked! After I made the head, I started trying out different body shapes. One thing was certain: the body and front paws needed to be seamless. Since I already had a long time to think about it after I stopped working on that fox, I soon found the right shape and size. Then the body needed colouring. I looked at many wolf pictures and decided that my wolf needed to have a light-coloured chest with a grey back. But when I finished the body like that, the front looked like a straight flat piece, very shapeless and not at all what I had in mind. I had to use my imagination to think of a solution that still looked realistic but added much more character. I grabbed my main sketch and started drawing again. After a few tries I found something I liked and worked it out in crochet, and it looked perfect.

But then I had a setback. When I started the body, I thought, ‘I’ll figure out the back paws later’. That wasn’t very smart of me. When I pinned the basic back paws I had made to the body, it looked all wrong. Now I had a complex-looking, seamless body with simple, silly-looking back paws. That weekend I had no idea how I was going to shape them. And then I looked at Boeloe the Koala and got an idea: what if I slimmed down the body and create paws like Boeloe’s, with a hip and a leg part? Would that create the flexible look I desired? Some quick math revealed that I only had to slim down the lower bit of the body to compensate for the bulk the hips would add. Because I didn’t want to end up regretting that I hadn’t made a seamless tail, I also worked out how to create a hole for that.

After all the effort and a pile of failed attempts, Woolfie now is sitting in front of me and he is so gorgeous! He looks more like an excited wolf pup than an adult wolf, but who cares about that? This is a win-win situation: I made a super-realistic new wolf pattern AND I learned a lot of new crochet skills. And the good thing for you is, the way these techniques are worked into the pattern doesn’t make it much more difficult to make, because you can just follow the instructions. I have figured out for you how to do these cool things the easy way!

Here are some more pictures of sweet Woolfie, and below them you can find all the info you need about this wolf amigurumi pattern.

Info about & links to buy the pattern

This realistic crochet wolf is made with Istex Lett Lopi, a 100% wool with a lot of fuzziness. He is 6 inch / 15 cm sitting when made with this yarn. This isn’t a very difficult animal to crochet, even the seamless bits are quite easy to attach if you follow the instructions.

The pattern contains a clear and colour-coded description of how to crochet and assemble this animal, with extra illustrations and example pictures at the bottom to help you get everything right. In the pattern you can also find what materials you need, the yarn colour numbers, in short, everything you need to know to make your own realistic wolf amigurumi. All the additional information you need to know about this pattern you can find in the shop listings. You can buy this pattern in my shop at Ravelry, Etsy or order it here.

This pattern has a one dollar release discount till Thursday the 16th of April!

Boeloe, crochet koala bear pattern

Many crafters are making koalas at the moment to give attention to this vulnerable animal that has suffered so much from the fires in Australia. I decided to join them and have designed a beautiful koala amigurumi pattern. This is Boeloe, a super-sweet and vulnerable-looking crochet koala.

realistic crochet koala bear

It really breaks my heart to read and see what has happened to animals in Australia. Not only koalas and other mammals but so many birds, reptiles and insects have suffered and died in the fires. It’s devastating! I really hope designers like myself can help rescue wildlife and restore habitats a little bit by designing patterns so people can make and sell the dolls to collect money to donate to Australian wildlife organisations. I will donate the earnings from the first six patterns I sell to Wires, an Australian wildlife rescue organisation. I know it is not a huge amount, but even small donations help.

When designing this animal, there were so many pictures of burned and suffering animals that it was hard to find example pictures. But I tried my best to create a cute and realistic-looking crochet koala. Very important to me was to capture its vulnerability, which was difficult. I figured that as long as I tried to make the face look as realistic as possible, it should work. When I posted a teaser picture on Instagram, someone commented “so sweet and vulnerable-looking.” I was really glad it showed! Despite all the devastating pictures, it was interesting to design this pattern. To me, koalas are kind of silly-looking animals, with their big heads and lack of tails. But they are incredibly cute and they have absolutely gorgeous, almost teddy-like fur. It was a fun challenge to design a pattern that matched that cuteness. I had thought about brushing the animal all over, but I decided not to. The texture of the Lopi yarn adds enough fuzziness, and I like it when you can clearly see that it is a crochet animal. Here are some more pictures of this adorable koala amigurumi and below them you can find info about and links to buy the pattern.

Info about & links to buy the pattern

Boeloe is made with Istex Lett Lopi, a 100% wool with a lot of fuzziness. If you use the recommended yarn, your koala will be 4.7 inch / 12 cm sitting.

The pattern is written in US terms and contains a clear and colour-coded description of how to crochet and assemble the animal, with extra illustrations and example pictures at the bottom to help you get everything right. In the pattern you can also find what materials you need, the yarn colour numbers – in short, everything you need to know to make your own vulnerable friend. All the additional information you need to know about this pattern you can find in the shop listings. You can buy this pattern in my shop at RavelryEtsy or order it here.

This pattern has a one dollar release discount till Thursday, the 19th of February. I hope many of you will make this pattern, just for yourself or to sell, so that together we can help Australian wildlife! If you like to see quick updates about my work, please follow my Instagram page.

Crowly, crochet raven pattern

I hereby present to you yet another dark and mysterious creature: meet Crowly the crochet raven, or crow, that’s up to you!

amigurumi crow

I’ve wanted to make a raven or crow for a long time, but until now I hadn’t gotten into it. Crows aren’t cuddly cute creatures, but they are very intelligent and compassionate. I’m fascinated by them, and I especially love ravens. For a few years now we’ve seen ravens in the areas we hike. Well, most of the time we just hear their ‘krok krok krok’ call.

Now why have I called my raven amigurumi ‘Crowly’? To be honest, I wasn’t sure wether to make a crow or a raven. I assumed crows would be more loved and popular than ravens, so when I first started I was thinking Crowly should be a crow. But because ravens are my personal favourite, I wasn’t sure what to choose. 

I think this pattern offers the option for the crafter to decide what it is. Ravens and crows both belong to the corvids (corvidea) species. There are differences between the animals, especially the size and the shape of the wings, but this pattern isn’t realistic enough to show them. The details I added for the wings will work perfectly for either a crochet crow or raven, or even a rook if you make the top of the beak black.

Here are some more pictures of this adorable crochet raven/ crow, and below them you can find info about and links to buy the pattern.

Info about & links to buy the pattern

Crowly is made with Istex Lett Lopi, a 100% wool with a lot of fuzziness. If you use the recommended yarn, your bird will be 5 inch / 13 cm standing.

The pattern is written in US terms and contains a clear and colour-coded description of how to crochet and assemble the animal, with extra illustrations and example pictures at the bottom to help you get everything right. In the pattern you can also find what materials you need, the yarn colour numbers – in short, everything you need to know to make your own cuddly corvid. All the additional information you need to know about this pattern you can find in the shop listings. You can buy this pattern in my shop at RavelryEtsy or order it here.

This pattern has a one dollar release discount till Thursday, the 25th of December, Christmas day! If you like to see quick updates about my work, please follow my Instagram page.

Mr. Batty, crochet bat pattern

realistic crochet bat

I proudly present to you Mr. Batty, a common pipistrelle bat, who got delayed and couldn’t arrive in time for Halloween. But does that really matter? You can still see these wondrous creatures in November, just in time before they go into hibernation for the winter. And of course, crocheting a fabulous bat you can do all year long!

The pipistrelle bats in my courtyard inspired me to make this realistic crochet bat pattern. For some years they seemed to have gone, but this year I started seeing them again at dawn. Fast and swift I saw them fly between the houses and when I got lucky, I could see their perfect shape very clearly, such gorgeous little creatures they are!

This small and realistic bat is a bit bigger than the palm of your hand when you hold it with the wings spread. I’ve decided to keep everything pretty basic but strikingly realistic. You only need two colours of yarn to make this bat amigurumi, and you can decide for yourself if you want to use pipe cleaners. I’ve used them to keep the wings in shape, but if you make Mr. Batty for a little child, pipe cleaners aren’t an option, so you can stuff the tiny arms and legs to make them more steady. If you’re experienced, you can make this bat in an afternoon, although the tiny arms and legs are a bit fiddly to crochet. I tried working with i-cords instead of 4-stitches-wide tubes, but the i-cords weren’t steady enough to balance the wings.

Info about & links to buy the pattern

Mr. Batty the crochet pipistrelle bat is made with Istex Lett Lopi, a 100% wool with a lot of fuzziness. If you use the recommended yarn, he will have a span width of 18.5 inch/ 22 cm. I would strongly recommend a fuzzy yarn, because it hides the seams of the colour changes.

The pattern is written in US terms and contains a clear and colour-coded description of how to crochet and assemble the crochet bat amigurumi, with extra illustrations and example pictures at the bottom to help you get everything right. In the pattern you can also find what materials you need, the yarn colour numbers, in short, everything you need to know to make your own wondrous crochet bat. All the additional information you need to know about this pattern you can find in the shop listings. You can buy this pattern in my shop at Ravelry, Etsy or order it here.

Heads up: it has a one-dollar release discount till Thursday the 21st of November.

A Son’s Popkes postcard!

Painted Christmas card

For a long time I thought about offering the Popkes artworks I made, some as Christmas cards, as postcards. I never actually dared to do it, until now! After many friends and crafters told me I really should give it a try, I decided to have my favourite winter-themed artwork printed as a postcard, how exciting! You can now order ‘A Popkes winter wonderland’ as an A6 postcard in my Etsy shop. I decided to offer a single card ($1,85) and sets of 2, 4, or 6.

The postcards are printed on 350gsm sulfate cardboard. The front is semi-glossy and the back is matte, perfect to write on. They are professionally printed in the Netherlands. On the back in the bottom left corner you’ll find a small graphic and info about the artwork. There is plenty of space to write on.

These cards feel like a classical winter animal tale. They would make a perfect Christmas greeting to send to your loved ones and friends or a lovely wall decoration to brighten up your room! If you are a Popkes fan, you know who’s on this card, but to those of you who don’t know, this postcard features Flam the fox, Finse the rabbit, and Falun the badger. For years it has been a tradition of mine to paint an original Christmas card to send to my family and friends. Before I started Son’s Popkes, I painted funny scenes featuring Santa experiencing bad luck. But when Son’s Popkes became a success, I realised it would be great fun to make the crochet animals the main characters of my Christmas cards. At some point, I even started painting more Popke artworks, where the animals are doing all sorts of things in their natural environment. Who knows what their next adventure will be?

Where to buy?

You can purchase the cards here. Keep in mind that if you order these in December, they will take longer to arrive because of the Christmas rush.

If you have questions or remarks about this postcard, don’t hesitate to leave a comment, I would love to hear from you!

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