Free crochet snail pattern

Am I serious? Yes, I thought it would be fun to make a crochet snail, a little friend who can accompany the hedgehog in pictures. So why not make a free pattern as well. I know you all yearned for a crochet snail. Who doesn’t want to make a crochet snail?!

Crochet snail pattern

Before you start

This pattern is written in standard American crochet terms. It’s useful to read it before you start. If you use the recommended yarn, your snail will be 3 inch / 7 cm long. The yarn I’ve used is Istex Lètt lopi, a 100% wool. Use a stitch marker to mark the beginning of a round, move it up each time you start a new round.

Materials

For these snails you’ll need worsted weight yarn and an E US/3.5 mm crochet hook. You need 2 colours of yarn (left-over bits are enough): I’ve used light beige (0086) and acorn (0053) for the light snail and oatmeal (0085) and chocolate (0867) for the darker one. I’ve split a strand of the darkest colour to embroider a mouth. You will also need fibrefill to stuff the snail and a pipe-cleaner to bend the body is optional. Not really my style, but I painted the eyes, using acrylic paint. I couldn’t think of another way the create dark dots. (Needle felting could do the trick, but most people don’t have the tools for that.)

Accessories

Hook E US / 3.5 mm, scissors, embroidery needle, stitch markers or paper clips.

Abbreviations: ch = chain, sc = single crochet, st = stitch, sl st = slip stitch, hdc = half double crochet stitch, dc = double crochet stitch, s2tog = invisible decrease, dec = normal decrease.

Instructions

Shell

The whole shell (round 2 – 5) is worked in the backloops only, so the unworked frontloops form a visible spiral on the outside of the shell.

1. magic ring of 4 = 4

2. 2 sc in each around = 8

3. (sc in next, 2 sc in next) x 4 = 12

4. sc in each around = 12

5. (sc in next, dec) = 8, sl st in 1st backloop and leave yarn end for sewing.

 

Body

1. magic ring of 4 = 4

2. sc in each around = 4

3. (sc in next, 2 sc in next) x 2 = 6

4-9. sc in each around = 6

10. sc in next, s2tog, sc in next, 2 sc in next 2 = 7

11. sc in next, s2tog, sc in next 2, 2 sc in next, sc in next = 7

12. s2tog, sc in next 2, 2 sc in next, sc in next 2 = 7

13. repeat round 12 = 7

14. sc in next, 2 sc in next, sc in next, s2tog x 2 = 6, sl st and leave yarn end for sewing.

You can now insert a pipe cleaner if you like to use one. Sew the hole closed by putting the needle from the inside out through all the outside loops of the 6 st, clockwise. If  you do it correctly, you can now pull the end and it will close the gap. Weave in the end.

Make the eyes by attaching the yarn at the side of the head, between round 2 and 3. Ch 3 st, in 2nd ch from hook sl st and weave in the yarn ends as shown in the image. You can embroider the mouth between round 1 and 2.

Now stuff the shell and attach it to the body. Position the shell as shown in the image and sew between the frontloops of the last round so you don’t change the edge. I’ve sewn back and forth between the side of the snail. 

There, your not-so-slimy slimy new friend is finished! 

A barn owl pattern in progress

Some of you know already I am working on a barn owl pattern. A while ago I posted a picture of the face I designed on Instagram and I’ve been busy working on the body. At the same time I’ve been working on other things and everything isn’t going as speedily as I had hoped for.

So here’s a little progress update. Last week I finished the barn owl’s body, thinking this would be the final version. But I am not completely satisfied just yet. I tried something new to attach the tail and wings seamlessly and it looks very neat, but new things take more time.

In the picture you see prototype 2. I want to use a lighter colour for the wings and back. Also, I don’t like how the spots on the belly are positioned, I tried to make them look random, but they’ve become quite geometrical on the right side (in this picture). And I think the chest needs to be a bit wider, the wings are too close to each other. I’m hoping to publish the barn owl pattern the first or second week of October and it looks like I am going to make that date!

I’ve also been working on a crazy little free pattern, a little creature many of us don’t like to have in high numbers in our gardens, but hedgehogs do. Yes, they will be cute! That pattern will be available here by the end of this week.

And what could it possibly be?

Dapper Poochey, crochet rabbit pattern

Well, what happened here? I liked Poochey in his trendy cardigan so very much that I decided to add him as a “dapper rabbit pattern” to my shops. Would you’ve been able to resist it? Just look at this utterly adorable crochet rabbit in his fancy outfits!

I cannot give myself all the credit for this. After I released the little cardigan pattern, Jan made a delightful collection of lovely little cardi’s for her crochet bunnies. After seeing her ever-so-cheerful pictures, I decided I just had to make a separate pattern for Poochey in the cardigan. I made Poochey’s cardigan just for fun after seeing a knitted rabbit wearing a sweater on Instagram, but when I put the sweater on and took that picture of him a while back, I began to get the idea of making a separate pattern. But because it felt a bit strange to re-launch an existing pattern, I wasn’t sure if it was a good idea. Jan made me realise that it is! Not everyone who visits my blog would want this version, but I don’t want other crafters missing out on this.

And how much fun it is to make all those little cardigans! Not only that, but all the tiny cute buttons you can’t put on your own garments, you can use for little bunny cardigans. I had so much fun looking for buttons that matched my bright-coloured sweaters. I found buttons with flowers and stars, animal-shaped ones – oh, there are so many fabulous buttons to find! And I cannot help laughing at Poochey’s expression every time I see it. In every single picture he has that same look of utter confusion. Which cardigan is your favourite? Mine is the green one with the star buttons.

Here are few original pattern pictures of this dapper crochet rabbit; below them you can find info about and links to buy the pattern.

Info about & links to buy the pattern

Poochey and his cardigan are made with Istex Lett Lopi, a 100% wool with a lot of fuzziness. If you use the recommended yarn, he will be 7 inch / 17 cm high. I would strongly recommend a fuzzy yarn, because it hides the seams of the colour changes.

The pattern is written in US terms and contains a clear and colour-coded description of how to crochet and assemble the crochet rabbit amigurumi, with extra illustrations and example pictures at the bottom to help you get everything right. In the pattern you can also find what materials you need, the yarn colour numbers, in short, everything you need to know to make your own dapper rabbit(s). All the additional information you need to know about this pattern you can find in the shop listings. You can buy this pattern in my shop at Ravelry, on Etsy or order it here.

Heads up: it has a one-dollar release discount till Thursday the 11th of June. If you already have the pattern for Poochey and Fudge but want to make Poochey like this, you can find the free pattern for the cardigan here.

Free doll cardigan pattern

Maybe I should call it ‘Popke crochet cardigan pattern’. How cute is this?!

Most of you have already seen Poochey in his dapper outfit on my Instagram page and I got many requests for the little cardigan pattern. Because I wanted to design another little cardigan for the squirrel, I wanted to publish both when the squirrel was finished. And now is the time! Here are two free patterns for very trendy Popke cardigans. The cardigans are about the same size but the rabbit cardigan has different shaped sleeves, the squirrel cardigan doesn’t really have sleeves.

Instructions

I’ll keep this pattern very basic. The cardigans are approximately 7 cm / 3 inch wide and high, when made with worsted weight yarn and hook 3.5 mm/ E. I’ve used Istex Lett Lopi for the cardigans, the same yarn as the animals are made with.

Abbreviations: ch = chain, sc = single crochet, st = stitch, sl st = slip stitch, hdc = half double crochet stitch, BLO = work in back (inside) loops only, lst = loop stitch, s2tog = invisible decrease, pm = place marker.

The cardigans are made in rows. After you’ve made the starting chain, you do a first dc in the 4th ch from hook. You’ve actually made two dc’s because the top of the chain that forms when you work into the 4th stitch will be the 1st dc. After each turn, you ch 3 and dc in 5th ch from hook. Here you also make two dc’s in one and by skipping the 1st dc (that’s why you work into the 5th st) you keep the stitch count the same. It’s useful to keep marking the 1st stitches, because you might overlook them.

Rabbit cardigan

1. ch 26, in 4th ch from hook dc (pm in 1 st before this dc), dc in next 22 = 24, turn

2. ch 3, in BLO: in 5th ch from hook dc (pm in 1 st before this dc too), dc in next, 3 dc in next, dc in next 4, 3 dc in next, dc in next 6, 3 dc in next, dc in next 4, 3 dc in next, dc in next 3 = 32, turn

3. ch 3, in 5th ch from hook dc (make sure to mark the right stitch as 1st), dc in next 2, 3 dc in next (this is in the middle st of the 3 you did in the previous row), dc in next 6, 3 dc in next, dc in next 8, 3 dc in next, dc in next 6, 3 dc in next, dc in next 4 = 40, turn

4. ch 3, in 5th ch from hook dc, dc in next 3, dc in next (in the middle of 3), skip 8 st, dc in next (middle of 3), dc in next 10, dc in next (middle of 3), skip 8, dc in next (middle of 3), dc in next 5 = 24, turn

5. ch 3, in 4th ch from hook dc, dc in next 22, 2 dc in last = 26, turn

6.ch 1, in 2nd ch from hook sc, sc in next 5, hdc in next 2, dc in next 10, hdc in next 2, sc in next 5, sl st in last = 26, weave in yarn end.

Now sl st a neat seam all the way around the cardigan (not the collar) by starting at the top left corner. Make sure you have the same number of stitches on each front. The unworked loops from round 2 should be on the inside of the cardigan. You can add some buttons if you like, there is enough space between the stitches to form the buttonholes.

Squirrel cardigan

1. ch 26, in 4th ch from hook dc (pm in 1 st before this dc), dc in next 22 = 24, turn

2. ch 3, in 5th ch from hook dc, dc in next 2, skip next 3, ch 4, dc in next 10, skip next 3, ch 4, dc in next 4 = 26, turn

3. ch 1, in 2nd ch from hook sc (1st stitch), sc in next 7, dc in next 10, sc in next 8 = 26, turn

4. ch 1, in 2nd ch from hook sc, sc in next 4, hdc in next 3, dc in next 10, hdc in next 3, sc in next 5 = 26, turn

5. ch 1, in 2nd ch from hook 2 sc, sc in next 4, hdc in next 3, dc in next 10, hdc in next 3, sc in next 4, 2 sc in next = 28, turn

6. ch 1, in 2nd ch from hook sc, sc in next 4, hdc in next 4, dc in next 10, hdc in next 4, sc in next 4, sl st in last = 28, weave in yarn end.

Now sl st a neat seam like you did for the other cardigan. I’ve added small beads as buttons because there isn’t much space between the stitches to form buttonholes. But there are of course alternative ways to create ‘buttonholes’.

Note: this 1st version of the pattern isn’t edited professionally as, just by me, so if you notice a mistake, please let me know.

Copyright © 2019 by Sonja van der Wijk.

Floof, crochet squirrel pattern

Now look what I’ve made this time, a new and improved crochet squirrel pattern! This is Floof, a cheeky little grey squirrel.

realistic amigurumi squirrel

Some of you might be thinking, ‘A squirrel amigurumi? I thought you were making a fox?’ And erm, yes, I did write that I was working on a fox. But I just couldn’t resist using the new skills I learned when I made the rabbit pattern for a more realistic squirrel pattern. Because in short, that is how designing works sometimes. You learn something from making one animal and a process starts in your head where that new skill is enhanced for another animal. When I was working on the fox, an idea began evolving around a squirrel. ‘What if I made the rabbit’s body more curved with smaller feet and a bigger belly patch, wouldn’t that be perfect for a crochet squirrel if I combined it with a tail similar to the look of the hedgehog spines?’ I asked myself. And when something so exciting like that starts to take shape in my mind, I can barely wait to start making it!

It sounded easier than it was. Creating the characteristic curved back of a squirrel was rather difficult to design, especially when there also had to be a white belly patch. I couldn’t just decrease a few stitches here and there at the back and increase them on the front, because that made the belly look way too wide. So I had to find the right balance between a curved back and a good looking belly. The squirrel turned out a little bit less bent forward than I had imagined, but I like this better. Because Floof is standing up a bit, he looks much more cheeky, like real grey squirrels look after they’ve come into your garden and stolen the bird food. I’m very satisfied with this look – and the tail … the tail is magnificent! The loop stitches take a bit more time to make, but after they are cut and brushed a bit, they absolutely make a very realistic, fluffy squirrel tail. For this grey squirrel amigurumi, I’ve used two contrasting colours of a thinner yarn to create a double coloured effect, but you can of course choose one colour as well. I think I’m totally in love with this fellow. And because I like red squirrels even more, I think I’ll have to make another squirrel very soon! Here are some more pictures of this scrumptious looking crochet squirrel, and below them you can find info about and links to buy the pattern.

Info about & links to buy the pattern

Floof is made with Istex Lett Lopi, a 100% wool with a lot of fuzziness, and the tail is made with two strands of Lopi Einband held together. If you use the recommended yarn, your squirrel will be 5.5 inch / 14 cm standing.

The pattern is written in US terms and contains a clear and colour-coded description of how to crochet and assemble the crochet squirrel and acorn, with extra illustrations and example pictures at the bottom to help you get everything right. In the pattern you can also find what materials you need, the yarn colour numbers – in short, everything you need to know to make your own realistic fluffy squirrel. All the additional information you need to know about this pattern you can find in the shop listings. You can buy this pattern in my shop at RavelryEtsy or order it here.

This pattern has a one dollar release discount till Thursday the 20th of June.

An experiment

Hi dear crafters,

Just writing this short post to let you know I’m going to try something new. It might sound like a big thing, but not to worry, my style will never change. What I am going to do is trying a new type of body. For a long time I’ve been thinking about making more flexible crochet animals. The idea is that these dolls can lie on their bellies, but can also sit upwards. To make them more soft and flexible I’m thinking of using a different, thinner yarn, called Drops Alpaca.

I have no idea if this will work, and maybe I’m able to get the right result with Lett Lopi, but I need some time to work it out.

I also hope to create a type of body that needs less assembling in the end. Sno & Snoosle and Poochey & Fudge already are a start of that, but I want to take it a few steps further, where you create holes from where you later can crochet ahead for the arms and legs. I’m very curious myself how that will work out.

I’m very excited about this for a while now and finally decided to give it a go. I’m starting with a playful little fox. I can’t promise there will be a pattern soon, but I’ll try my best to create the fox pattern I have in mind.

Happy Easter for now!

 

Poochey and Fudge, crochet rabbit pattern

How did this happen? I wasn’t going to create new standing rabbits?! I wanted to redesign my lop rabbit pattern. But oh, my, they are so fabulously funny and cute, how could I stop making them? I very proudly present to you Poochey and Fudge, a new crochet bunny and lop rabbit amigurumi!

easter bunny, crochet rabbit pattern

It all started with pears. When designing the crochet rabbit’s head, I realised a rabbit head is pear-shaped. Basically, when you draw a pear, then draw a little circle at the bottom of it with a nose and mouth in it, ears at the top and eyes over the sides in the middle, you have a perfect bunny head. Knowing that, I didn’t immediately know how to translate that into crochet, but it helped a lot and made me discover the not-so-obvious head shape I now so love. Yes, my rabbits have pear-shaped heads too.

At this point, I still was working on a realistic lop rabbit, but having fun designing, I decided to also try a different-coloured head with the ears up. And that made all the difference! Not only did I love this version, so did many of you when I showed a little preview on Instagram. When contemplating this funny-looking character (yes, just a head, but I saw the rest of him), I knew an on-all-fours body would not work with this design. I imagined a silly, chubby, standing rabbit.

I also realised the leg/ feet shape of the sea otter would work perfectly for a flexible crochet rabbit body. Very cute, playful, and soft! These little bunnies have become so very whimsical. I adore their silly curly ears and surprised expressions. With crochet rabbits like these, there is no need to try to make them look perfect. It’s their wonkiness that makes them so utterly adorable.

You might be wondering about the differences between Poochey and Fudge. There aren’t many more than the eyes can see. They are practically the same with different colouring, except Fudge’s head is a bit narrower at the top and the lop ears are longer and shaped a bit differently, that’s all.

Here are some more pictures of these funny-looking crochet rabbits, and below them you can find info about and links to buy the pattern.

Info about & links to buy the pattern

Poochey & Fudge are made with Istex Lett Lopi, a 100% wool with a lot of fuzziness. If you use the recommended yarn, Poochey will be 7 inch / 17 cm high and Fudge 6 inch / 15 cm. If you are making a Poochey, I would strongly recommend a fuzzy yarn, because it hides the seams of the colour changes.

The pattern is written in US terms and contains a clear and colour-coded description of how to crochet and assemble the crochet rabbits, with extra illustrations and example pictures at the bottom to help you get everything right. In the pattern you can also find what materials you need, the yarn colour numbers, in short, everything you need to know to make your own utterly cute duo. All the additional information you need to know about this pattern you can find in the shop listings. You can buy this pattern in my shop at Ravelry, Etsy or order it here.

This pattern has a one dollar release discount till Thursday the 3rd of April.