Tag Archives: amigurumi

Staruman, crochet sheep pattern

With pride and delight, I present to you, Staruman the crochet sheep pattern.

crochet sheep pattern

Staruman is a sheep, but of course a ram too. It is always hard to say which of the amigurumi’s I made is my favourite and it changes occasionally, but this one is very special for sure. The majestic horns and wooly texture of the loop chain stitches of the body make him unique and stunning looking. I had no experience at all with the chain loop stitch (twisted loop stitch) but it is so easy to do and worth the effort.

When I started working on this crochet animal, I had a clear image in my mind of how I wanted him to look. I knew the horns had to be partly worked in the back loops to create the lined structure and the body needed a special stitch too, something that would exaggerate the wooly coat. I started practicing with the loop stitch but didn’t like the result. The loops where thin and when cut the body looked like a pompom. I needed a bulkier, textured sort of loop. That is when I discovered the chain loop stitch. It is easier to make than a loop stitch, just takes more time because of the chains you make before each single crochet stitch. But the result is fabulous.

And about the light spots behind the eyes. For a while now I’m trying to create a more subtile looking eye patch. For this sheep I found a very simple and effective solution and nothing needs to be sewed on, so it always looks the same.

Staruman might look a bit more complicated than most of my patterns, but don’t let it fool you because he is just as easy to make. Crocheting the body and horns only takes a bit more time, that’s all.

Here are a few more pictures of Staruman the crochet sheep and below them you can find info about and links to buy the pattern.

Info about & links to buy the pattern

This impressive, cute and curly sheep is made with Istex Lett Lopi, a 100% wool. He is sitting 14 cm / 5.5 inch tall. Despite his looks, he is quite easy to make and you can finish your sheep in a day or so. I strongly recommend using a fuzzy yarn because it gives the best result for both the eye patches and chain loop stitches.

This crochet sheep pattern contains a clear and colour coded description of how to crochet and assemble the sheep, with extra illustrations and example pictures at the bottom to help you get everything right. In the pattern you can also find what materials you need, the yarn colour numbers, in short, everything you need to know to make your own loopy friend. All the additional information you need to know about this pattern you can find in the shop listings. You can buy this pattern in my shop at Craftsy and in my shop at Ravelry or order it here.

This pattern has a one dollar release discount till Friday the 16th!

An exciting new design

Sometimes a small coincidence can make all the difference. After I finished the piglet pattern, I started thinking about what animal to make next. Usually, I already know what to make next when I am working on another one but this time that wasn’t the case. That was until I saw this lovely crochet horned sheep on someone’s Instagram feed. It was not made in my style but it looked so nice and interesting that I could immediately visualise how I could make a fabulous sheep, it was instant inspiration. In fact, it made me so excited I wanted to start right away!

And I did. The sheep is already finished and looking spectacular. Now only the pattern needs to be written, edited and tested and I can hit publish.

I assume you are curious about the kind of sheep I made. I based my sheep on a local heather sheep called Drents heideschaap. It is a sheep I often see on our hikes through the countryside. The sheep are curious and friendly grazers with a slender build and long tails. The males have these gorgeous horns that grow in a lovely curl.

In my ‘about’ story I added a picture on which you see me walking with a tail of curious sheep, that is them indeed, but just the hornless females. In the last picture below (from the web) you see how the males look with their impressive horns.

Oh, I am so excited to show you the finished sheep and hope to be able to do so by the end of this week. Here are some glimpses and one funny pic of a curious young sheep I met this week.

See you at the end of the week!

Mr. Creeper says Hi

There are several free patterns to find at my blog, but Mr. Creeper is my favourite and he deserves some extra attention. If you feel linke making something creepy but cute, try this pattern, it is fun. The legs acquire some patience to crochet but this amigurumi is so worth the effort because let’s face it, Mr. Creeper is one cute spider. You can find the free pattern below the image, go for it!

crochet animal patterns

For this pattern you’ll need worsted weight yarn and hook US E/3.5 mm. to get an approximately 6 inch / 15 cm tall spider, measured from front to back paw. I’ve used the darkest brown colour of Lètt Lopi, a 100% wool. You will also need fiberfill, animal eyes, I used 7 mm eyes. Safety eyes with big backs won’t fit in the head so make sure you are going to use eyes that do fit. You also need pipe cleaners for the legs, so you can bend them into shape.

 

Body

1. magic ring of 6

2. 2 sc in each around = 12

3. (sc in next, 2 sc in next) x 6 = 18

4. (sc in next 2, 2 sc in next) x 6 = 24

5. 2 sc in next 2, sc in next 10, 2 sc in next 2, sc in next 10 = 28

6-7. sc in each around = 28

8. s2tog, sc in next 10, s2tog x 2, sc in next 10, s2tog = 24

9. (sc in next 2, s2tog) x 6 = 18

10. (sc in next, s2tog) x 6 = 12

11. s2tog x 6 = 6

Now close the gap by inserting the needle from the inside out, trough all the outside loops of the 6 st clockwise. If you do it correctly, you can pull the tail and it will close the gap. Sew in the end.

 

Head

1. magic ring of 5

2. 2 sc in each around = 10

3-4. sc in each around = 10

Leave yarn end for sewing.

 

Legs (make 8)

1. magic ring of 4

2-11. sc in each around = 4

Leave yarn ends for sewing. You can now insert the pipe cleaners. Stretch the paws so they get the desired length and leave the tip of the pipe cleaner sticking out, so you can later push it into the body.

 

Jaws

ch of 2, in 2nd ch from hook sl st. (leave both tails long enough for sewing)

 

Assembling the spider.

Finish the spiders face by attaching the eyes and sew on the jaws. I sewed Mr. Creepers jaws tight by sewing both ends to the head. Now you can attach the head to the body. After this I attached the paws neatly opposite to each other, by inserting the ends of the pipe cleaners first. If they are in the right spots, sew them tight.

There, your creepy crawler is finished, Happy Friday!

Working on Ida monkeys

Hi peeps, it seemed appropriate to give you an update about what I’m up to. I am doing something I normally would not do. I am making two Ida monkeys as assignments. When I started Adi’s pattern, I planned on making an extra monkey for my friend and illustrator Esther van Hulsen. But I didn’t plan on making another one. When Esther showed Adi to the professor that bought the Ida fossil, he was so delighted with the result he wanted to have one too. Well, I could not reject that, it felt fair to make him one too.

img_4346So, now I am working on the monkeys. I have to change their appearance a bit to make these look exactly like Esther’s version, but that makes it more fun.

You probably wonder why I never take assignments to make animals. Well, the main reason is that I get attached to them. When working on them I start to love them and have trouble giving them away. Also, if I would take more assignments like these, it would mean I would be constantly making the same animals and have less time designing new patterns, and that is what I love doing most. Every time it’s a challenge to create a new and fabulous looking doll and it keeps me fresh!

Now about a new design. I haven’t decided yet what animal I am going to make after I have these monkeys finished and I am open to suggestions. If you come up with something I really like, it might be the animal I am making next. So don’t be shy and let me know what you would like to see!

A very special project

This fresh new year, I am starting with a very special project. I am making the pattern for a fossilised monkey. And it is not even that simple, the monkey I am making is a prosimian or a lemur monkey. The researchers are not completely sure about it. This monkey, called Ida (based on Darwin’s name), died 47 million years ago and was found in Messel, Germany.

monkWhy am I making a fossilised monkey that lived 47 million years ago? To be honest, I’m not really a monkey fan. They just aren’t my kind of animals. I do love some lemurs and prosimians and please don’t get me wrong, I don’t dislike monkeys, but they aren’t on my list of cute and cuddly things that make me feel all happy like when I see a guinea pig, fox or squirrel.

But this Ida monkey does! This was the cutest and most beautiful monkey ever. A friend of mine, who is a wildlife and paleo artist, made the most fabulous illustrations for a book about Ida. Because Ida was so very well preserved, Esther could draw her exactly as she looked, except for the colours. They couldn’t see those from the fossil so she had to chose the most likely colours. And how she portraid Ida, I was in love with her from the start! She made the monkey look so gorgeous and exotic.

Ida is a lemur or prosimian monkey and has this specific type of body. I really like the shape of her head and flexible form. She is perfect for the monkey I like to make. The coloured illustration you see is one of the illustrations Esther made for the book. Ida is the baby monkey carried by the mother.

idaEsther has asked me before if I could make an Ida monkey, but I never wanted to because it doesn’t exist anymore and therefor crafters won’t recognise the crochet monkey. But lately I was thinking about making a hanging monkey and got stuck on which type. I asked Ether if she knew an extra cute one and of course she said I should make the Ida monkey. I wasn’t sure about it at first but the more I thought about it, the less unlikely it felt. Why wouldn’t I make a pattern for this type of monkey? Ida is absolutely gorgeous and If I design a hanging Ida monkey, I bet many crocheters would just love it. The colours can easily be replaced for colours of existing monkeys if one prefers so what’s the problem. It was done. I was making a fossilised monkey as first project of the year! Now to think of a suitable name…

 

Just a little update

Hi Crafters! I just wanted to let you know I am working on a new pattern. An armadillo that is and I must say, it is very challenging! Making the mostly seen on four legs creature sitting on its bottom for one thing is a bit tricky,  but let’s not forget about that very cool but difficult to crochet armour.

img_3987I have the head finished and decided to go for one piece. Originally I thought of giving the head an armoured patch, but I couldn’t manage myself to get it into the right place so that was a no go. Now, the armoured part of the head is crocheted differently than the rest of the head and to let it stand out more I used a neat looking and simple sewing trick. You’ll find out more about that when I publish the pattern.

Yesterday I spend most of the day by googling crochet stitches that give a smooth texture. The body armour is worked flat in rows. Working in rows and therefor turning your work, results in a sort of striped texture because every row you work in the opposite direction of the previous row. I needed to find an existing crochet stitch with a very different texture. Luckily for me, that isn’t very hard these days. Just type the right search terms and a whole new world of crochet stitches opens up for you. I found the perfect stitch for the body armour, called the linen stitch (or moss, or granite stitch) and it is very easy to do, it isn’t even a stitch really but more a skip and chain thingy but it gives a gorgeous knit looking texture.

Well, I am off now, have to actually make the armour and the rest of the armadillo. I wish you all a lovely weekend!

Son’s Popkes Holiday gifts CAL & photo contest!

santa-and-rupert-guinea-pigs

Hi there lovely Crafters!

It still feels a lot like autumn but the holiday season is getting so close. Many of you crafters will be making their own gifts and a lot of Popkes will be made. Therefor, let’s share some crafty fun! I thought it would be a splendid idea to give a crochet along another try. And, by adding an Instagram and Ravelry photo contest to this CAL, you can win two of my patterns.

You can join this festive crochet along in my Ravelry group. It starts now and ends December 24, just before Christmas. You can choose any of my patterns.

There will be a discount on all my patterns for this CAL too. The coupon code for a 10% discount you can find in the CAL’s topic in my group.

There’s also an Instagram and Ravelry photo contest attached to this CAL, where the winner can win two of my patterns by their choice and a second price of one pattern.

  • To join the photo contest, simply post a gorgeous picture of the end result in the CAL thread on Ravelry and add it is your entry for the contest.
  • If you do not have a Ravelry account but are making Popkes as Christmas gifts, you can also join via Instagram, if you do, use hashtag #popkejoy
  • You can enter the maximum of three pictures
  • The winner will be announced on boxing day, December the 26th.

Do not be shy and join my group and this CAL, it is so much fun. You meet lovely new people and can even make friends, and you can win two patterns. If you can, share the word about this CAL and photo contest, the more people who join, the merrier.

See you in my group!

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